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So, I am making an end table  that has three drawers and am using ball bering metal glides. The drawers have flush recessed false fronts. Hopefully I’m using the right description. I mounted the glides to the carcass and to the drawer boxes. These have panels between each drawer so, access is only from the top. 

Question is, how to center the false fronts, with even spacing, side to side, top to bottom, to the drawer boxes? 

This morning at 4:30, I had an awakening. So I drilled two shallow holes in the back of the drawer fronts and clipped off the ends of 4 penny nails and inserted them into the holes. With drawer boxes in place, I positioned the drawer fronts in place and used playing cards as spacers to even the gaps. I then pressed the drawer fronts against the boxes to leave an indentation. I was able then to align the fronts to the boxes to secure the two with screws from the inside of the boxes. 

Is there a another and better way of doing this? 

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I don't know if it is a better way, but I use double sided turners tape to attach and adjust drawer fronts.  Makes it easy to readjust. Turners tape is very thin and usually I don't have to remove it before I permanently attach the front. 

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I use kind of a combo of Coop's shims and Bob's double stick tape.

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“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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Never had any luck with double side tape. So I shim the front in place an shot a couple brads in thru the drawer an that will hold it in place long enough to put a couple screws in it. 

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I do it a few different ways depending on the particular drawer front.

If the front will have a pull, I locate the pull, pilot drill the holes, line up the front using cards as shims and then screw through the handle holes to secure the front to the box.  From there, I go from the inside to secure the drawer front and then remove the screws I put in the handle holes and install the handle.  I'm pretty sure I've shown this method in a few videos.

If the drawer does not have a pull then, I'll use double stick tape.  I only rely on that tape to get the drawer back open and get some real clamps on it.  From there, I secure from the inside as normal.

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Thanks bud. I tilted it back to show the gaps and in doing so, the thing that looks like a chip on the left side of the rail between the middle drawer and bottom, is actually a shadow line. 🙄 It happened while gluing up the sides and frames and I wasn’t about to stop and start over. In the upright position, you really have to really look close. Confessional over with. 

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Thats down right nice work Ken. Looks like walnut for the  beadcock around the drawer fronts, correct?

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“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”  John Wooden

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Yes sir, walnut around the drawer fronts.

i started out doing a journal but when I got to the point where I used dye stain on the side panels and they came out looking like crap, I quit. Since I got some butternut from Spanky and haven’t used any yet and I figured the side panels were ok with a softer wood, they would do good except the contrast wasn’t right. After watching many videos and bugging a bunch of folks, I tried several combos on scrap and the water based dye stain looked the best. When it was all said and done, it almost looks like a chocolate colored paint. But I bet my employee that gets it won’t mind. 

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1 hour ago, Coop said:

Thanks Kev! I’m out of likes

Happy to help..

The theory is that they help prevent "cupping".  As someone who's using properly dried lumber, I just don't see this being an issue.

The mass producers I'm sure cheat to buy time and crank out product before it's been properly dried.  To help prevent issues, I'm sure they cut these grooves.  

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Kinda,  sorta. This is where the micrometer came in handy. I knew that after I glued the molding to the outer edges of the face board that I was screwed if it didn’t fit. Taking a hand plane to one side meant taking it to all drawer sides and not only would that be a PIA but me and hand planes are just casual friends at best. And as an aside, Kev’s miter sled was spot on with cutting the walnut pieces. 

Oh, and if it’s not obvious, I cut the trim and thicknessed it before cutting the drawer fronts to final size. 

Edited by Coop
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Now I’ve never done it but from what I’ve seen on cockbeading. Is bring the drawer to final fit to the opening then rabbet all the way around the front then recess the bead into rabbet. You can adjust the bead thickness before glueing it to it for perfect fit

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